Research Paper: Impacts of tidal stream power on hybrid energy system performance: An Isle of Wight case study

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Impacts of tidal stream power on hybrid energy system performance An Isle of Wight case study.pdf
Impacts of tidal stream power on hybrid energy system performance An Isle of Wight case study.pdf

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Authors

Daniel Coles, Bevan Wray, Rob Stevens, Scott Crawford, Shona Pennock, Jon Miles

Abstract

A new dispatch model is implemented to investigate how the adoption of tidal stream power alongside solar PV, offshore wind and energy storage affects energy system performance, in the context of the Isle of Wight energy system. Based on an average annual demand of 136 MW, results show that installing 150 MW of solar PV, 150 MW of offshore wind, and 120 MW of tidal stream capacity enhances supply-demand balancing by reducing net annual energy shortage, and the magnitude of power surplus, by 20% relative to the best performing solar+wind system. These impacts can reduce the power rating and energy storage capacity of inter-seasonal energy storage, which are key drivers of its cost. In general, these findings are consistent over a range of different demand profiles, and in cases where gross renewable energy supply either matches or exceeds annual demand. Based on 2040 cost projections, it is estimated that the adoption of tidal stream results in a 15% increase in the combined LCoE of renewable and back-up supply, relative to the best performing solar/wind case. This premium can only be justified if it is outweighed by the benefits tidal stream adoption provides, such as those demonstrated in this research.